Joint Pain Treatments

Joint Injection
Many common causes for joint pain, such as osteoarthritis, can be treated with an intra-articular corticosteroid injection. The most commonly injected joints at Premier Pain Treatment Institute are the shoulders, hips, knees, and ankles. We are experts in the use of ultrasound guidance for joint injections to improve accuracy and safety.

Bursa Injection
Bursa sacs located throughout your body serve as cushions to reduce irritation of bones, muscles, and tendons. When a bursa sac develops inflammation, this is called bursitis. The most common types of bursitis that we treat are trochanteric bursitis and sub acromial bursitis. Most bursa injections are performed with ultrasound guidance for improved accuracy and safety.

Joint Pain Treatments

Viscosupplement Injection
A person with knee osteoarthritis that has not improved with conservative options, including corticosteroid injections, may be a candidate for viscosupplementation of the knee joint. As osteoarthritis progresses, the concentration of hyaluronic acid in the synovial fluid begins to decline. This results in increased inflammation, reduced mobility, and pain in the joint. For some people, a series of intra-articular injections with a hyaluronic acid viscosupplement can help lubricate the joint to improve mobility and provide pain relief.

Viscosupplementation is FDA-approved for use in the knee joint, but it is also successful for some people with "off-label" use in other large joints.

Genicular Nerve Block
When corticosteroid and viscosupplement injections are no longer effective in relieving knee pain from osteoarthritis, the other non-surgical option to treat this pain is called a genicular nerve block. During this procedure, the superior medial, superior lateral, and inferior medial genicular nerves are blocked with local anesthetic to prevent pain signals coming from the knee joint. Oftentimes, corticosteroid will be added to the injection to provide lasting relief. This injection is also effective in patients with persistent pain after a total knee replacement.

Genicular Radiofrequency Ablation
When genicular nerve blocks are successful in temporarily improving the knee pain, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is administered in an attempt to provide at least 6-12 months of pain relief. With RFA, radio waves produce an electrical current that applies heat to the genicular nerves and disrupts their ability to transmit pain signals for an extended period of time.

Articular Branch Block for Hip Pain
When corticosteroid injections are no longer effective in relieving hip pain from osteoarthritis, another non-surgical option is an articular branch block. With this procedure, the articular branches of the femoral and obturator nerves are blocked with local anesthetic. Oftentimes, corticosteroid will be added to provide lasting relief. This injection is also effective in patients with persistent pain after total hip replacement.

Articular Branch Radiofrequency Ablation
When articular branch blocks are successful in temporarily improving the hip pain, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is administered in an attempt to provide at least 6-12 months of pain relief. With RFA, radio waves produce an electrical current that applies heat to the articular branch nerves and disrupts their ability to transmit pain signals for an extended period of time.